16 Atlantic hurricane predictions going back to the 1800s

With the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s hurricane season come projections of the number and intensity of Atlantic hurricanes. Here are some of the annual predictions with data back to the 1800s. In the…

16 Atlantic hurricane predictions going back to the 1800s

With the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s hurricane season come projections of the number and intensity of Atlantic hurricanes. Here are some of the annual predictions with data back to the 1800s. In the Atlantic, the period between June 1 and Nov. 30 is considered hurricane season, while those from Nov. 1 to April 30 are tornado season.

Record High: 2,922 storms (1999-2004)

Record Low: 101 (2007)

Record Length: 342 days (2012)

Record Low: 49 days (2004)

Record Highest & Lowest Wettest: Hurricane Andrew, 1992, 1.27″; Hurricane Billy, 2005, 0.11″

Weekly Wettest: June 3-11, 1984, 11.08″; Andrew, 1992, 5.19″

Number of Hurricanes (2029—2034):

1973—3

1980—2

1987—2

1991—2

1995—2

1998—2

1999—2

2001—2

2004—2

2011—2

2012—2

2013—2

Mister D—5.4, 1955

Mister E—3.7, 1980

Mister F—5.6, 1989

Mister G—6.8, 1949

Source: NOAA

2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season

Here is a look at the number of hurricanes (classified by intensity) that formed in each Atlantic hurricane season from 1950 through the present.

14

2015 season (Jan. 1-Nov. 24)

Last year, the Atlantic had 12 hurricanes. Only three were major hurricanes:

Category 3 or above

1

Category 2

2

Category 1

Tropical storms are less strong than hurricanes but have more wind speed (36 mph or higher) than tropical storms.

Category 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

1

Category 3 and greater

20,072

6,821

2016

18

10

5

4

4

2016 season was also very active in the Pacific. Pacific hurricane season ran from June 1 through Nov. 30. Both Pacific and Atlantic hurricane seasons conclude with a single named storm. The Pacific hurricane season had eight named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher) and tropical storms, while the Atlantic had 12 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher) and tropical storms. By far, the strongest Pacific hurricane was Hurricane Katia, which hit Mexico in early October.

15

Includes Agnes, the costliest hurricane in U.S. history, which struck Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas in 1972 with winds of up to 130 mph. It killed 34 people and caused $4.9 billion in damages.

Source: NOAA

1997 Atlantic Hurricane Season

A heavy loss of life was not a typical hurricane season for the Caribbean and Caribbean islands, especially the islands of the Bahamas and Haiti. Storms spun up and weakened from the Atlantic. Tropical storms Aletta, Georges, Matthew, Gloria, Floyd, Humberto, Lili, Maria, Chris, Julia, Michele, Michael, Wilma, Nate, Irma, Hermine, Gordon, Nate, Ophelia, Sean, and Storm Barbara were frequent visitors to the Caribbean, making storm tracking more difficult.

17

Highest Category 4 or 5 storm winds

11

Highest Category 3 storm winds

31

Highest intensity on record

78

Highest sustained winds

21

Highest wind gusts on record

10

Highest winds on land

115

Highest sustained winds

31

Highest sustained winds on land

Source: NOAA

1991 Atlantic Hurricane Season

The Atlantic and Caribbean formed eight hurricanes (forecasters are starting to label tropical storms as such again):

Category 1 hurricane Wind strength Category 2 hurricane Wind strength Category 3 hurricane Wind strength Category 4 hurricane Wind strength Category 5 hurricane Wind strength Source: NOAA

1993 Atlantic Hurricane Season

Storm activity rose to 16 named storms, including five hurricanes (Category 2 hurricane strength):

Category 2 hurricane Wind strength Category 3 hurricane Wind strength Category 4 hurricane Wind strength Category 5 hurricane Wind strength Source: NOAA

2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season

18 tropical storms, 11 hurricanes and five major hurricanes were the most in any Atlantic hurricane season.

Highest rated hurricane

Colorado State University; Category 3 hurricane Wind strength Category 2 hurricane Wind strength Category 1 hurricane Wind strength Category 4 hurricane Wind strength Category 5 hurricane Wind strength Source: NOAA

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