Arwen power cuts: Irish homes and businesses wait

Image copyright Reuters Image caption The scene on the Irish coast as an ice storm and storm surge caused widespread damage Homes and businesses remained without power in Ireland, almost three days after powerful…

Arwen power cuts: Irish homes and businesses wait

Image copyright Reuters Image caption The scene on the Irish coast as an ice storm and storm surge caused widespread damage

Homes and businesses remained without power in Ireland, almost three days after powerful Storm Arwen hit the country.

Overnight, 156,000 homes were still waiting for electricity, with 36% of that number in the South and 36% in the North.

Some of those whose homes had not been restored were preparing to sleep in hotel rooms.

More than 2,000 homes and businesses in the Midlands had no power on Wednesday morning.

Irish authorities have said many homes may not have power restored until mid-to-late next week.

Tens of thousands of homes in Donegal, Cork, Waterford, Galway, Mayo, Leitrim, Wexford, North Kerry, Sligo, Westmeath, Cork City, Dublin City, Letterkenny and Limerick were still without power as of Wednesday morning.

Around half a million people across the country had lost power in total, with 1.6 million people still affected as of Tuesday afternoon.

As the weather finally eased on Tuesday, hundreds of people queued in Cork city centre to buy fuel and bring supplies to home.

Image copyright iStockphoto Image caption Paul Evans was with friends in the Mall when a car crashed into a stationary truck carrying petrol

Image copyright Reuters Image caption A man shields himself as gusts topple trees across Keel Roads, Cork city

“I’ve been told there are people waiting in a gas queue, which is a bit worrying. There is a petrol tanker queueing up to gas up,” Lylah Donegan, a bartender at the Mitchell Arms pub in Cork, told the BBC.

“The normal thing for us is we have a generator so we stay open but we’ll probably start to shut it down today or tomorrow to prepare for an extended wait.

“Electricity might be getting better but petrol prices are going up, so there is some irony there.”

Image copyright iStockphoto Image caption Members of the public queued to buy fuel as the wait for electricity continued in various locations across the county

Assistant captain Paul Evans had been working at the Mitchell Arms overnight and said that people had been “extremely brave” as they queued to buy fuel and had been “surprised” by the delayed response to the outage.

“There was a horrific accident on the on the Mall last night between the RDS and the Defence Forces Memorial and I was told they didn’t have petrol at the ready to get people home.”

“So we were out at our big gas cooker on the spit [overhead], with us having to bring in lots of pumps to bring in firewood and food supplies.”

“People were very brave, they had to do something to secure their own existence and some were incredibly brave.”

What’s next for Arwen?

BBC weather forecaster Julian Mayes said it would “probably” be daytime and possibly early evening on Thursday before power is restored.

“Storm force winds are not expected overnight and of course it’s far too early to pinpoint the exact path of the next system but some damage may be permanent,” he said.

Image copyright RTE Image caption TV coverage of the aftermath of Storm Arwen

He said that a number of people should be prepared for disruption to transport for the rest of Thursday.

BBC science correspondent Natalie Gillespie said the storm had completely disrupted the island’s ferries, and there had been a number of other issues caused by the storm, including structural damage to lamp posts and fallen trees.

Leave a Comment