Gabrielle Union: motherhood is too traumatising to endure in any other way

The 44-year-old has revealed how she juggles being both a working mother and wife. Some fans have praised her for speaking frankly Gabrielle Union has opened up about the challenges of being a working…

Gabrielle Union: motherhood is too traumatising to endure in any other way

The 44-year-old has revealed how she juggles being both a working mother and wife. Some fans have praised her for speaking frankly

Gabrielle Union has opened up about the challenges of being a working mother. The actress spoke candidly about juggling motherhood with her partner, Dwyane Wade, and has been praised by fans for her honesty.

Gabrielle Union opens up about balancing work and family life Read more

Writing for Lena Dunham’s Lenny Letter, Union described the “traumatic and depressing” part of caring for a child and also revealed that she regularly eschews postpartum depression – an absence that makes her feel “raped and deep-sixed”.

“As a parent, there is something so traumatic and depressing about giving birth that my coping mechanism was to avoid dealing with it in any way and just pretend it wasn’t happening,” she wrote. “Instead, it became a running joke between my husband and I that I was Drexel trying to stay on thin ice to ensure that I wasn’t beaten up by a fall, falling into a coma because of a lack of sleep, and my daughter was actually alive but we had just never met her, so we both assumed she hadn’t actually arrived. And I didn’t say anything to anyone about it because after many of those conversations, it seemed pretty obvious that everything that was happening to me was not normal.”

Union, who was previously married to singer Chris Rock, went on to explain how she was determined to juggle her career with being a mother, but that the physical challenges of motherhood have been harder than she expected.

“I’ve been given this beautiful, huge gift in my life – a child. I am overjoyed, but I have had to swallow my pride because at this stage of my life, the physical act of birthing a baby is way harder than I thought it would be,” she wrote. “The way I imagined it would be, and, at this point, has been faster. I’m still finding the flow of baby-to-mother, and I still don’t know all the answers. But I do know this: I have literally yelled at my child when she tried to hold something while I was sleeping, because it made my baby cry, and I know how exhausting that is. This happens a lot, and it’s very frustrating to me. This hasn’t been a pleasant part of the routine, and it does not make me feel good in the slightest.”

Union then addressed her postpartum depression, claiming it had inspired her to become more resilient.

“For the first six months of my child’s life, I was very depressed, I really almost threw my baby out of my house because she was too loud, and I had major anxiety attacks during the day,” she wrote. “It’s hard to talk about because there are real sufferers who go through something similar every day, and I’m not about to name them. But for me, that time in my life was very real, and it made me realise that it wasn’t just me. It’s the hardest part of parenting, and I won’t pretend like it’s easy. But I refuse to settle for less.”

Union’s confession comes after Jada Pinkett Smith called out Mariah Carey’s baby’s “gross diarrhea” while parenting at home. The two super-moms are part of the elite group of celebrities who are both parents and celebrities.

Union finished by revealing that she has adopted another technique to combat tiredness – the Interval Training Workout. She did yoga for an hour and, after a ten-minute snooze, continued to do yoga for an hour, then spent an hour doing some short walking for 45 minutes and ended with a heart-pounding run for 45 minutes.

It’s a rule that has worked wonders for her, she says.

“I would do this every day for, like, three days straight and feel better,” she wrote. “I also haven’t been depressed since I started doing it. Even with two kids, I can honestly say that I’m the luckiest person on the planet to not have postpartum depression, and that is truly the truth.”

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