Inside China’s censorship battle

Written by César Chelala, CNN From bleeping computer voice quipping, “How can I tell you are ****?” — which were ultimately removed — to censors suggesting that the most popular sport player in China…

Inside China's censorship battle

Written by César Chelala, CNN

From bleeping computer voice quipping, “How can I tell you are ****?” — which were ultimately removed — to censors suggesting that the most popular sport player in China — Deng Shudi — may already be dead, social media users are hilariously trying to evade the censors, which often work behind the scenes to shut down discussion of what the public chooses to post.

Here are just a few of the top censored topics in China, and the ways fans are fighting back.

1 / 6 In light of censors effectively removing an article reporting on a banned song, a dozen writers and media personalities weighed in on censorship in China. Credit: Tania Branigan

Two years ago, controversial singer Wang Jianjun faced the wrath of Chinese censors for his hit song “wang jianjun, you will pay,” just days after it reached the top of the country’s iTunes iTunes list.

“Most lyrics are thought up by our parent writers, but when it comes to making even first-hand observations, media experts give experts strong clues,” Wang told CNN.

Though the song is still widely watched, in September, Wen Gaoyue, a reputable sportswriter and commentator, became the first person to be removed from Sina Weibo, China’s version of Twitter, for anti-CPC posts.

“Despite this, the Weibo community collectively questioned why Wen was removed, and we pushed for the government to allow them to publish their voices,” said Wen.

“The Weibo community pushed for a point in China that has been suppressed for such a long time: The right to protest,” said Wen.

“Censorship is a result of the regime controlling people’s free speech … You’re not supposed to criticize the CCP, but when you’re not going to listen to the Party, something has to be done,” said Wang.

The talk about dodgy zit spots, depression and tight pants proves that freedom of speech is alive and well, even in China, where the government is constantly fighting to maintain control over its people.

Scroll down to see how fans are concealing the censors’ eyes.

*CNN has not endorsed or stated its position on this content.

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