Shocking trial begins of baby’s mother accused of killing him

The Court of Queen’s Bench in Wiltshire has begun hearing evidence in the trial of a mother accused of murdering her child by giving him a fatal injection of insulin. Kimberly Potter has pleaded…

Shocking trial begins of baby's mother accused of killing him

The Court of Queen’s Bench in Wiltshire has begun hearing evidence in the trial of a mother accused of murdering her child by giving him a fatal injection of insulin.

Kimberly Potter has pleaded not guilty to causing her son Daunte’s death at a house in Cheltenham.

Daunte was brought to hospital just over a week after he was born on 4 May, with his mother, who had at that point given birth to twins and was on intravenous fluids, telling staff he had come into sudden distress.

He was admitted to Bristol Children’s Hospital, where a post mortem examination was carried out.

An investigation was then launched and it emerged that the tot had suffered fatal brain damage after being given a lethal dose of insulin by his mother.

Speaking from the dock, Potter told Wiltshire Crown Court that she “did not put her children at any risk”, and denied both murder and manslaughter.

Jurors at the court heard that she had taken small quantities of ketamine and the “new” anti-viral drug Tamiflu after being initially taken ill due to a miscarriage.

It was also suggested that she should have been sectioned under the Mental Health Act after her baby was born.

Harry Harrison, the prosecution’s counsel, told the court that at the time of the incident the mother had been suffering from mental health problems, including several pre-existing conditions, as well as having a second pregnancy, which she was due to give birth to any day.

He said: “Her actions and state of mind in the period immediately before her son’s death were entirely dictated by those conditions, along with the additional pressures of being under duress and potentially being detained under the Mental Health Act.”

The court heard that a clinical psychiatrist had found that Potter, 29, of The Pyrenees, Cheltenham, had a “useful and unlimited” ability to think in its right or wrong.

If found guilty of murder she could be jailed for life, while if found guilty of manslaughter she could be sent to a secure unit.

Eight women and six men will be selected as the jury to hear the case.

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