What could happen if the Trump administration tries to shut down Mississippi’s last abortion clinic

For Tuesday’s lawsuit to succeed, a judge in the court where the case was filed had to rule the abortion law unconstitutionally burdens women’s constitutional right to make such an informed choice. It could…

What could happen if the Trump administration tries to shut down Mississippi's last abortion clinic

For Tuesday’s lawsuit to succeed, a judge in the court where the case was filed had to rule the abortion law unconstitutionally burdens women’s constitutional right to make such an informed choice. It could be tough to make that argument, as The New York Times notes, but Mississippi must submit to it.

The law requires all abortions to be performed in Mississippi by a doctor who has admitting privileges at a local hospital. This is a tricky hurdle for Mississippi women seeking abortions, because only three of the state’s 15 hospitals are willing to grant privileges to abortion providers. The other 13 are too small to accommodate visitors or even to have doctors available to see them.

“The added obstruction, which Jackson Women’s Health Organization says it has faced in seeking surgical privileges, has resulted in delays in scheduling outpatient surgical procedures and prompted many clinic employees to work a second or third job to make ends meet,” writes the Times.

As a result, abortions for about 500 of the 800 women who get abortions in Mississippi every year are now performed in the surrounding states. “Currently, those women get care from facilities in neighboring Alabama, Tennessee and Louisiana.

“If the law is allowed to stand, some women from Mississippi who want to see a doctor for an abortion will have to travel some distance to do so, forcing them to spend at least $1,000 for a plane ticket, or to pay for a flight from the plane and bus ticket to the facility,” writes the Times.

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